Data Structures and Algorithms with JavaScript - Bringing Classic Computing Approaches to the Web

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Michael McMillan 978-1-449-36493-9 O'Reilly 2014
Over the past few years, JavaScript has been used more and more as a server-side computer programming language owing to platforms such as Node.js and SpiderMonkey.

Over the past few years, JavaScript has been used more and more as a server-side computer
programming language owing to platforms such as Node.js and SpiderMonkey.
Now that JavaScript programming is moving out of the browser, programmers will find
they need to use many of the tools provided by more conventional languages, such as
C++ and Java. Among these tools are classic data structures such as linked lists, stacks,
queues, and graphs, as well as classic algorithms for sorting and searching data. This
book discusses how to implement these data structures and algorithms for server-side
JavaScript programming.
JavaScript programmers will find this book useful because it discusses how to implement
data structures and algorithms within the constraints that JavaScript places them, such
as arrays that are really objects, overly global variables, and a prototype-based object
system. JavaScript has an unfair reputation as a “bad” programming language, but this
book demonstrates how you can use JavaScript to develop efficient and effective data
structures and algorithms using the language’s “good parts.”

Why Study Data Structures and Algorithms
I am assuming that many of you reading this book do not have a formal education in
computer science. If you do, then you already know why studying data structures and
algorithms is important. If you do not have a degree in computer science or haven’t
studied these topics formally, you should read this section.
The computer scientist Nicklaus Wirth wrote a computer programming textbook titled
Algorithms + Data Structures = Programs (Prentice-Hall). That title is the essence of
computer programming. Any computer program that goes beyond the trivial “Hello,
world!” will usually require some type of structure to manage the data the program is
written to manipulate, along with one or more algorithms for translating the data from
its input form to its output form.

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