Applications of Hydrogen Peroxide and Derivatives

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By Abdul Wahab Posted on Dec 7, 2020
In Category - eBooks, Chemistry
Craig W. Jones 0-85404-536-8 Royal Society of Chemistry 1999
Hydrogen peroxide, as well as being an incredibly simple inorganic compound, is also a beautifully versatile one. Over the last decade it has had somewhat of a rebirth in both industrial and academic circles.

Hydrogen peroxide, as well as being an incredibly simple inorganic compound,
is also a beautifully versatile one. Over the last decade it has had somewhat of a
rebirth in both industrial and academic circles. The rather glib explanation for
such a renaissance is due to regulatory forces causing the chemical industry to
reduce, and in some instances eliminate, environmental pollution. However,
such a reason does a great disservice to hydrogen peroxide. Whilst it is true that
environmental agencies and legislation have caused a major shift in emphasis
during the latter half of the century and polarised our efforts on so called 'green
chemistry', by far the most overriding reason why hydrogen peroxide is now
more popular is due to the fact that the chemical industry has learnt to employ
the chemical in a safer, more efficient, and innovative manner. In addition,
hydrogen peroxide and its derivatives can not only be employed for their
traditional bleaching applications or for the manufacture of pharmaceutical
and fine chemicals, but also have uses in a diverse array of industries. Precious
metal extraction from the associated ores, treatment of effluent, delicing of
farmed salmon, and pulp and paper bleaching are but a few areas where
hydrogen peroxide has had a profound effect on the quality of all our lives.
The aim of this book is to allow those unfamiliar with the versatility of
hydrogen peroxide and its derivatives to walk into their laboratories and to look
for possible applications in their own areas of expertise where hydrogen
peroxide can perhaps help increase a yield, purify a compound, or afford a
more environmentally benign route to be devised. The author would also like to
encourage educationalists to attempt to introduce courses on hydrogen peroxide
on an academic and practical level to not only undergraduates but to
those of school age studying the sciences. The introduction of topics like this
coupled with an understanding of catalytic routes to industrially important
chemicals will hopefully encourage future scientists to think in terms of
relatively benign synthetic methodologies rather than being constrained by the
chemistries of the 19th century synthetic chemist.
This book has been organised such that each chapter

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